This session has been completed.

Learning Through Story featuring Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton: Creating a New Narrative

Cancelled
Facilitator(s): Christy Jordan-Fenton
Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton
Billie-Jo Grant
Kerri Trombley
Etienna Moostoos-Lafferty
Date:October 04, 2019
Time:9:00 am – 3:30 pm
Cost:
$175.00
(includes breakfast & lunch, which are not prepared in a nut/gluten-free environment)
Location: Edmonton (River Cree Resort and Casino)
300 E Lapotac Blvd, Edmonton, AB T7X 3Y3
Google Map
Course code: 20-AB-014

Target Audience

K - 12 Teachers

Also Recommended For

School-based Administrators; Instructional/Learning Coaches; District Leaders/Consultants

About this learning opportunity

Session DescriptionsIndigenous Literature Showcase • Speaker Biographies

The breakout sessions following the keynote speaker will offer two 90-minute sessions featuring Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, Billie-Jo Grant, Kerri Trombley, as well as the Creating a New Narrative Panel Discussion at the end of the day. Topics include exploring the use of Indigenous literature in elementary and secondary, trauma informed practice for an Indigenous context, addressing stereotypes of Indigenous peoples, cultural appropriation, stories of resilience, and information that supports foundational knowledge of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit.

*Participants will have a choice of two breakout sessions to attend on a first-come, first-served basis, as there is limited room capacity for each session.


Session Descriptions

Keynote
9:00 am

I am Not a Survivor I am an Overcomer

Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton and Christy Jordan-Fenton

Inuvialuk elder Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton, and her daughter-in-law Christy Jordan-Fenton discuss restoring agency to the residential school narrative, with a shift from oppression focussed stories to stories of spiritual and cultural strength, and resourcefulness and resilience. Christy and Margaret are the award-winning co-authors of four books (Fatty Legs, Not My Girl, A Stranger at Home, and When I Was Eight). Through Margaret’s lived experiences, Christy will share how Margaret was not merely a passive victim, but an active participant in overcoming her years at a remote residential school in Aklavik. 

 

 

Breakout 1
Option 1

10:45 am

When I Was Eight

Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton and Christy Jordan-Fenton

Margaret and Christy introduce methods of teaching residential school history to K-4, in age-appropriate and engaging ways. This session is based on their books When I Was Eight and Not My Girl, and includes other literary resources, interactive teaching tools, and guidelines suitable for young learners. Learn why it is beneficial for young students to explore difficult stories, when done in a safe and sensitive manner.

 

 

 

Breakout 1
Option 2
10:45 am

Indigenous Resources: What Does “Accurately” Reflect Mean? Looking at Indigenous Resources with a Critical Lens

Etienna Moostoos-Lafferty

When engaging in Indigenous themes, what do I need to consider? Authenticity? Appropriation? Identity? Terminology? Together, we will unpack many contemporary issues when considering appropriate resources in education. We will leave with more confidence in choosing educational resources with Indigenous content and with more exposure to what exists currently that promotes the strength and diversity of First Nation, Metis and Inuit people.

 

 

  

Breakout 1
Option 3
10:45 am

Building Your Foundational Knowledge in Métis Education While Addressing the new TQS

Billie-Jo Grant

Participants will have the opportunity to explore authentic Métis education resources, dig deeper into the Alberta Teacher Quality Standard, and explore the ATA online self-reflection tool to create purposeful, professional goals.

 

 

 

Breakout 1
Option 4
10:45 am

Kerri Trombley

What is trauma-informed practice in education? This ‘buzz’ word is creating a stir, but what does it actually mean to be trauma-informed? How do we know when to use a trauma lens or a behaviour lens? Join us for an open and honest conversation about the relationship between trauma, brain development, culture and resiliency. This session will provide you with some guiding principles to understand behaviour, classroom strategies through anecdotal stories of success and failure. We will discuss the brain basics, strategies, intergenerational trauma and culturally sensitive environments. We will also look at and analyze some case studies. Using a trauma-informed lens creates sustainable foundations for healing, wellness and resilience, resulting in strength and hope.

 

 

Breakout 2
Option 1
12:45 pm

Say Your Name

Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton and Christy Jordan-Fenton

Based on Margaret’s lived residential school experiences, Margaret and Christy discuss cultural reclamation, residential school history, Inuvialuit culture, and resilience, using their books Fatty Legs and A Stranger At Home. The authors introduce supplementary resources, and methods for responsibly teaching middle grade to high school students. This session will focus on the narrative of overcoming shame and finding strength in personal and cultural identity.

 

 

Breakout 2
Option 2
12:45 pm

TRUTH First: Encounters with Stereotypes and Common Misconceptions and Images of Indigeneity

Etienna Moostoos-Lafferty

In this session, you will embark on a truth mission, digging into the how and why of stereotypes of Indigenous people in Canadian society. You will be exposed to many misconceptions about Indigenous people and learn how education and media have worked to shape contemporary ideas of "Indigeneity." We will unveil some of the most prevalent (and sometimes uncomfortable) myths about Indigenous people and focus on how to rebuild and repair relationships through ally work and accurate resource acquisition.

 

 

Breakout 2
Option 3
12:45 pm

Creating Memorable Métis Moments Through Literacy

Billie-Jo Grant

Choosing quality Métis literature is an important consideration for all educators when using stories to teach. This session is designed for participants to explore several authentic, recommended resources that help to create teachable moments and provide meaningful learning opportunities.

 

 

Breakout 2
Option 4
12:45 pm

 Kerri Trombley

“These events don’t just target an individual, they target a whole collective community...the trauma is held personally, and can be transmitted over generations. Even family members who do not have a direct experience of the trauma itself can feel the effects generations later”

           — Karina Walters, Ph.D.


Intergenerational trauma affects families in ways that cannot always be seen. Historically, traditional school settings have not had a positive impact on Indigenous peoples as a collective, nor been a positive experience. As educators, administrators and school staff, we all have a responsibility to provide a safe, caring and understanding environment that acknowledge and respect Indigenous historical and contemporary contexts. In this session, we will discuss ways to make schools, classrooms and the “principal’s office” inviting spaces for our First Nations, Métis and Inuit families.

   

Indigenous Literature Showcase

Indigenous books and resources from the Edmonton Public Library, Audrey’s Books, Eschia Books, Circle Teachings, Indigenous Knowledge and Wisdom Centre, Book Publishers Association of Alberta, and Pearson will be available to browse and/or purchase.

 

About the facilitators

Christy Jordan-Fenton has been an infantry soldier, a bareback bronc rider, a survival instructor, and a wild pig farmer, among other things, and has lived in Australia, South Africa, and Vermont. She has a master’s diploma in Human Rights and Forced Displacement from UPEACE, and is a Vital Voices Lead Fellow. She lives in Fort St. John, BC, but keeps an active traveling schedule. She and her mother-in-law, Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton, speak with 100 audiences a year, from Anchorage to Havana. Her greatest passions are spending time with her three children (Margaret’s grandchildren), writing, and studying dance. Margaret is not only someone Jordan-Fenton has spent an enormous amount of time with throughout the journey of unearthing Margaret’s childhood stories for four books, and the grandmother of Jordan-Fenton’s children, she is also her best friend and partner in crime. The two have gotten up to many antics in their ten years on the road together sharing Margaret’s experiences. There may or may not be a story about a couple tattoos in there...



Margaret Olemaun Pokiak-Fenton was born on Baille Island in the Arctic Ocean, en route with her nomadic family to their winter hunting grounds on Banks Island. Being Inuvialuk, her young childhood was filled with hunting trips by dogsled and dangerous treks across the Arctic Ocean for supplies in a schooner known as the North Star. At the age of eight, she traveled to Aklavik, a fur trading settlement founded by her great-grandfather. There, she attended the Catholic residential school—an experience she documented with her daughter-in-law, Christy Jordan-Fenton, in four award-winning children’s books. Unlike most children, she begged to go to the residential school, despite the horrific reputation of such institutions. There was nothing she wanted more than to learn how to read. In her early twenties, while working for the Hudson’s Bay Company in Tuktoyaktuk, she met her husband-to-be, Lyle, and followed him south to Fort St. John, BC to become a cowboy’s wife. Together, they raised eight children. Margaret is very active, speaking across Canada sharing stories of resilience, the path to reclaiming cultural identity after residential school, and traditional Inuvialuit culture. She is featured in Keith Secola’s music video “Say Your Name”, and is the subject of a successful touring musical, starring Sarain Carson-Fox. She is a traditional language keeper, and is well known for her beadwork, embroidery, and bannock.



Billie-Jo Grant is an educator with over 20 years of classroom experience teaching K-9 students in both the public and Catholic school divisions. She is a mom of three who embraces her family, Métis heritage, faith, inclusive practices, and animal rescue! Billie-Jo was the recipient of a 2017 Indspire National Award for being a role model in Indigenous education and also received a 2017 International Women's Award for her work in her local community and in Indigenous education. She recently completed her Masters in Religious Education through Newman Theological College and has stepped out of the classroom to work with Rupertsland Institute - Métis Centre of Excellence. Billie-Jo is passionate about building foundational knowledge, improving educator capacity, and developing resources that promote excellence in Métis Education.



Kerri Trombley is an educator with Sturgeon Public School Division. She has served as a teacher, counsellor, inclusive education coordinator and administrator. Her experience at a reserve school has given her a unique perspective into the relationship between educators and families, students and culture and the importance of language. She continues to be a leader in Indigenous education, literacy and trauma-informed practice in public schools as a Reading Specialist, Blanket Exercise facilitator and Neurosequential Model in Education trainer.



Etienna Moostoos-Lafferty was born and raised in Grande Prairie Alberta. Etienna's family is from the Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation in Treaty 8 territory. Etienna has 7 years of teaching experience both on and off-reserve, and also in public and Catholic school systems. Etienna spent 4 years working for an Indigenous perspective school with the Calgary Board of Education where she learned the importance of culture and language in Indigenous education.

Etienna has since moved back to Edmonton has worked provincially as an Indigenous Education consultant helping to develop and implement workshops aimed at promoting reconciliation through teacher education. Etienna has created resources for the ATA and ARPDC that help teachers better understand topics such as Residential Schools, Metis Settlements, Inuit history, Myths and Stereotypes of Indigenous people, progression of the TRC, and treaty relationships.

Today, Etienna is an Indigenous Education Coach for Evergreen Catholic Schools and is completing her masters at the University of Alberta. She is a mother to a 5 year old daughter named Layla and her husband is also a teacher and works as an assistant Principal for Edmonton Public Schools.



Follow them on Twitter!
@CJordanFenton@BillieJoGrant • @KTrombley123 ‏• @EtiennaLafferty

 

 

This session addresses the TQS competencies

  • #1: Fostering Effective Relationships
  • #2: Engaging in Career-Long Learning
  • #3: Demonstrating a Professional Body of Knowledge
  • #5: Applying Foundational Knowledge about First Nations, Metis and Inuit